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Beyond Egypt’s “Facebook Revolution” and Syria’s “YouTube Uprising:” Comparing Political Contexts, Actors and Communication StrategiesIcon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

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[1] In 2009, Internet penetration in Syria was 20.4 percent (International Telecommunication Union, 2011).

[2] Personal communication on June 24, 2011, Washington, D.C.

[3] Personal communication on April 24, 2011, Washington, D.C.