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Formerly TBS Journal

ISSN: 1687-7721

Peer Reviewed

Sources of Religious Information and Arab Youth Perception of Terrorist Operations (Arabic)Icon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

Public Attitudes Towards the Impact of New Media on Post-Revolutionary Egypt’s Political and Economic Landscape (Arabic)Icon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

Media Discourse Mechanisms: Encountering the Propaganda Strategies of Terrorist Organizations (Arabic)Icon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

The Framing of Women’s Issues in State-Owned TV Channels: A Social Responsibility Perspective (Arabic)Icon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

Academic Perspectives on Egyptian Television Coverage of the 2016 US Presidential Elections (Arabic)Icon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

News Coverage Frameworks of Islamic State Radio (Arabic)Icon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

Mediated Policy Effects of Foreign Governments on Iraqi Independent Media During Elections Icon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

Middle Eastern Minorities in Global Media and the Politics of National BelongingIcon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

The Arab Spring in Israeli Media and Emergent Conceptions of CitizenshipIcon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

Al-Jazeera’s relationship with Qatar before and after Arab Spring: Effective public diplomacy or blatant propaganda?Icon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

The Politics of Representation on Social Media: The Case of Hamas during the 2014 Israel–Gaza ConflictIcon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

Travelogue of the Israeli Protest: A Dialogue with Contemporary Street PoetryIcon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

State Control Over Film Production in EgyptIcon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

The Birth and Death of 25TV: Innovation in Post-Revolution Egyptian TV News FormatsIcon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

Revolutionary Art or “Revolutonizing Art”? Making Art on the Streets of Cairo Icon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

Mubarak Framed! Humor and Political Activism before and during the Egyptian RevolutionIcon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

In an entertaining and insightful read, Deepa Anagondahalli and Sahar Khamis delve into the world of Egyptian political humor, unpacking its historical roots and reflecting on its evolution from private banter to public resistance. Focusing on Mubarak’s presidency and subsequent ouster, the authors identify a stark shift from long narrative jokes, to the biting “weaponized” one-liners that emerged in his final days. Humor, they conclude, is a paradoxical yet powerful tool for activism, which despite more recent crackdowns has proven to be a relatively safe platform for dissent.

From TUNeZINE to Nhar 3la 3mmar: A Reconsideration of the Role of Bloggers in Tunisia’s RevolutionIcon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

Blog by Z http://www.debatunisie.com

Amy Kallander delves into the world of Tunisia’s educated and upper-middle class bloggers to reveal a more nuanced picture of their role in the Tunisian revolution. Reviewing the country’s unique history of Internet activism and government censorship, she finds that their impact was not only more limited than western media accounts claimed, but in many ways, more interesting.

Revolutionary Media on a Budget: Facebook-only Social JournalismIcon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

In one of the first studies of Egypt’s Rassd News Network (RNN), Yomna Elsayed explores how this Facebook-based citizen journalism network became the most influential news source during the revolution. Placing RNN in the context of alternative media launched on social networks, she explores the reasons for its success as well as the challenges that it faces.

Job Satisfaction and Editorial Freedom at Al-Arabiya: Finding the Balance while Covering Volatile Middle East NewsIcon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

In the first survey of its kind, Mohammed el-Nawawy and Catherine Strong study job satisfaction among journalists working for Al-Arabiya TV. They explore how the channel’s Saudi ownership and coverage of the Arab uprisings shape perceptions of editorial freedom, job security and job satisfaction, pointing to a new understanding of journalism values among news workers at pan-Arab satellite channels.

Beyond Egypt’s “Facebook Revolution” and Syria’s “YouTube Uprising:” Comparing Political Contexts, Actors and Communication StrategiesIcon indicating an associated article is peer reviewed

Activists coordinate online from Cairo's Tahrir Square / Photograph by Sarah Sheffer

Sahar Khamis, Paul B. Gold and Katherine Vaughn compare and contrast the role of social media in the Egyptian and Syrian uprisings, providing a comprehensive review of the tactics used by both activists and regimes. The ability of new technologies to effect political change, they argue, is determined by pre-existing social, political and communication structures.

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