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Egypt

PODCAST | Questioning the Narrative

Abdalla Hassan, author of Media, Revolution and Politics in Egypt (I.B. Tauris) and Associate Director of the Adham Center for Television and Digital Journalism, speaks with outspoken TV presenter Reem Maged about the post-revolution media landscape and freedom of expression in Egypt. Maged spoke to us following her lecture on "Media Manipulation" at the American University in Cairo.

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PODCAST | Tackling Egypt’s National Broadcasting Dilemma

For the first episode of the Arab Media & Society Podcast, Managing Editor Sarah El-Shaarawi speaks with Hafez Al Mirazi, a veteran of Arab and international broadcasting and Director of the Adham Center for Television and Digital Journalism at the American University in Cairo about why reforming Egyptian national broadcasting is essential to its survival.

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Oct. 30, 2015 – Controversial TV anchorwoman Riham Saeed resigns as channel suspends her show

Al-Nahar TV Network announced Friday the suspension of Sabaya al-Kheir TV program hosted by controversial anchorwoman Riham Saeed, who resigned amid public outrage against her for airing personal photos of a guest on her show without her permission. Last Tuesday, Saeed hosted Somaya Tarek, who claims to have been harassed by a man in a Heliopolis mall. On her show, Saeed appeared to defend the man and blame the woman, implying that Tarek "had brought it on herself." (Aswat Masriya)

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A Marriage of Misunderstanding

In April 2014, Egypt’s then foreign minister Nabil Fahmy used a marriage simile to describe the country’s relationship with the United States. At home, the expression didn’t translate. Muhammad Y Gamal discusses the challenges associated with media translation, and makes a case for the development of a coherent media translation policy in Egypt.

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Media Law in Egypt and the Universal Principles of Freedom of Expression

In an effort to elucidate the legal structures governing the media in Egypt, as well as the country's declared obligations according to international law, Mostafa Shaat offers a breakdown of the existing frameworks, highlighting inconsistencies between the legal concept of freedom of the press as delineated in international law and Egypt's national laws. He further discusses some of the current reform efforts underway.

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Media Privatization and the Fate of Social Democracy in Egypt

Nour Halabi asks why the social democratic aims of the January 2011 Revolution have not been advanced in the four years since. Halabi posits that private media ownership structures established during Mubarak's neoliberal economic reform initiative are largely to blame, arguing that despite the popular demands for social justice, the structure of Egyptian commercialized media inhibited the translation of social justice demands into discussions of economic policy.

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